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Advising on tech company IPOs July 6, 2018

Silicon Valley-based technology company Pivotal Systems launched an initial public offering (IPO) and listing on the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) on 2 July 2018. The IPO raised $53.5 million, placing the value of the specialist … Continued

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Flying high: Maddocks acts on sale of private pilot training school to private equity July 6, 2018

Friday 6 July 2018 Law firm Maddocks has acted for the founder of Australia’s largest private pilot training school, Soar Aviation, on the group’s 50 percent sale to Australian private equity investor The Growth Fund. … Continued

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Choose your opinions wisely: The Fair Work Commission clarifies approach to conflicting medical reports July 16, 2018

In CSL Limited T/A CSL Behring v Papaioannou [2018] FWCFB 1005 a Full Bench of the Fair Work Commission (Commission) clarified that it will make an independent assessment of medical evidence when considering capacity for … Continued

Is Australia’s education system a mixed bag of excellence and mediocrity?

Better teaching quality, re-building the VET sector, genuine options for acquiring new skills as people switch jobs and careers, using new technological models for educating people, and creating teaching-only universities are just a few of the many changes that need to be made.

It’s not often that you see a headline like that in a report by government, to government and tabled in Federal Parliament.

Yet, that’s exactly how the Productivity Commission has summarised it’s findings on the Education Sector in its Shifting the Dial Report, tabled in the Commonwealth Parliament on 24 October 2017.

Chapter 3 of the Report and a number of its Supporting Papers focus on Future Skills and Work and concludes that “If we had to pick just one thing to improve … it must be skills formation” by (among other things):

  • Creating confidence and stability in the VET system and
  • Improving university outcomes – including by ensuring that the Australian Consumer Law applies to the higher education sector and giving universities some financial “skin in the game” – financial incentives linked to student and taxpayer outcomes.
  • Possibly, eliminating internal cross-subsidies between research and teaching within universities by making CSP funding more closely reflect the expected cost of teaching

We’ll be examining the report and policy responses by Commonwealth and State governments closely over the next few months.  Don’t hesitate to let us know if you’d like to discuss any aspect of the issues arising from them with any member of our Education Sector Team.

Author:   
Robert Gregory
Partner and Education Sector Leader
61 3 9258 3770
robert.gregory@maddocks.com.au

Better teaching quality, re-building the VET sector, genuine options for acquiring new skills as people switch jobs and careers, using new technological models for educating people, and creating teaching-only universities are just a few of the many changes that need to be made.

It’s not often that you see a headline like that in a report by government, to government and tabled in Federal Parliament.

Yet, that’s exactly how the Productivity Commission has summarised it’s findings on the Education Sector in its Shifting the Dial Report, tabled in the Commonwealth Parliament on 24 October 2017.

Chapter 3 of the Report and a number of its Supporting Papers focus on Future Skills and Work and concludes that “If we had to pick just one thing to improve … it must be skills formation” by (among other things):

  • Creating confidence and stability in the VET system and
  • Improving university outcomes – including by ensuring that the Australian Consumer Law applies to the higher education sector and giving universities some financial “skin in the game” – financial incentives linked to student and taxpayer outcomes.
  • Possibly, eliminating internal cross-subsidies between research and teaching within universities by making CSP funding more closely reflect the expected cost of teaching

We’ll be examining the report and policy responses by Commonwealth and State governments closely over the next few months.  Don’t hesitate to let us know if you’d like to discuss any aspect of the issues arising from them with any member of our Education Sector Team.

Author:   
Robert Gregory
Partner and Education Sector Leader
61 3 9258 3770
robert.gregory@maddocks.com.au