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Latest Case

Providing innovative procurement solutions for local government projects April 20, 2018

We advised City of Casey on the procurement process of the Bunjil Place Project. Bunjil Place is a $125 million civic and cultural precinct for the City of Casey, encompassing an 800-seat theatre and 200-seat … Continued

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In good hands: Maddocks advises on physio business acquisition April 11, 2018

Wednesday 11 April 2018 Maddocks has advised Zenitas Healthcare Limited on its acquisition of the Agewell Physiotherapy business. Agewell is a mobile physiotherapy provider servicing residential aged care facilities, retirement villages and communities in New … Continued

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The right to use plans prepared by a design consultant: the devil is in the detail April 11, 2018

When a design consultant (such as an architect or engineer) brings their plans or designs into material form, copyright will usually subsist in those documents as an artistic work. The designer owns that copyright unless … Continued

Is Australia’s education system a mixed bag of excellence and mediocrity?

Better teaching quality, re-building the VET sector, genuine options for acquiring new skills as people switch jobs and careers, using new technological models for educating people, and creating teaching-only universities are just a few of the many changes that need to be made.

It’s not often that you see a headline like that in a report by government, to government and tabled in Federal Parliament.

Yet, that’s exactly how the Productivity Commission has summarised it’s findings on the Education Sector in its Shifting the Dial Report, tabled in the Commonwealth Parliament on 24 October 2017.

Chapter 3 of the Report and a number of its Supporting Papers focus on Future Skills and Work and concludes that “If we had to pick just one thing to improve … it must be skills formation” by (among other things):

  • Creating confidence and stability in the VET system and
  • Improving university outcomes – including by ensuring that the Australian Consumer Law applies to the higher education sector and giving universities some financial “skin in the game” – financial incentives linked to student and taxpayer outcomes.
  • Possibly, eliminating internal cross-subsidies between research and teaching within universities by making CSP funding more closely reflect the expected cost of teaching

We’ll be examining the report and policy responses by Commonwealth and State governments closely over the next few months.  Don’t hesitate to let us know if you’d like to discuss any aspect of the issues arising from them with any member of our Education Sector Team.

Author:   
Robert Gregory
Partner and Education Sector Leader
61 3 9258 3770
robert.gregory@maddocks.com.au

Better teaching quality, re-building the VET sector, genuine options for acquiring new skills as people switch jobs and careers, using new technological models for educating people, and creating teaching-only universities are just a few of the many changes that need to be made.

It’s not often that you see a headline like that in a report by government, to government and tabled in Federal Parliament.

Yet, that’s exactly how the Productivity Commission has summarised it’s findings on the Education Sector in its Shifting the Dial Report, tabled in the Commonwealth Parliament on 24 October 2017.

Chapter 3 of the Report and a number of its Supporting Papers focus on Future Skills and Work and concludes that “If we had to pick just one thing to improve … it must be skills formation” by (among other things):

  • Creating confidence and stability in the VET system and
  • Improving university outcomes – including by ensuring that the Australian Consumer Law applies to the higher education sector and giving universities some financial “skin in the game” – financial incentives linked to student and taxpayer outcomes.
  • Possibly, eliminating internal cross-subsidies between research and teaching within universities by making CSP funding more closely reflect the expected cost of teaching

We’ll be examining the report and policy responses by Commonwealth and State governments closely over the next few months.  Don’t hesitate to let us know if you’d like to discuss any aspect of the issues arising from them with any member of our Education Sector Team.

Author:   
Robert Gregory
Partner and Education Sector Leader
61 3 9258 3770
robert.gregory@maddocks.com.au