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Providing strategic advice on expansion structures November 16, 2018

Founded in Bondi Beach in 2012, Bailey Nelson has rapidly grown into a global eyewear retailer and service provider with boutiques in Australia, London, Canada and New Zealand. The strong demand for their products and … Continued

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Maddocks appoints restructuring and insolvency partner in Sydney January 14, 2019

Monday 14 January  Maddocks has appointed its second new partner in a month with the appointment of Danielle Funston. Danielle is a restructuring and insolvency lawyer who advises clients on recoveries, liquidations, corporate restructuring and … Continued

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Made in Australia: Tightened restrictions on the use of country of origin labels January 14, 2019

The recent decision of Nature’s Care Manufacture Pty Ltd v Australian Made Campaign Limited by the Federal Court of Australia has provided much needed guidance on the requirements for ‘Made in Australia’ and other country … Continued

The corellas are back in town

Since February councils in Victoria have been battling with corellas, a type of cockatoo not native to Victoria.  As recent news articles suggest, the corella problem may now have developed into a corella plague, as many councils across Victoria are still affected by large flocks descending upon streets and parks and causing destruction. This problem is not just confined to rural councils with many flocks causing destruction in Melbourne’s inner eastern suburbs. In fact, rural and metropolitan councils across Australia are dealing with corella plagues.

Corellas feed on the seed pods of liquidambar trees and in their search for food they leave public spaces and private gardens in a state of desolation. In order to maintain the length and condition of their beaks, corellas chew through anything they can find: nets in tennis and netball courts, cabins, windscreen wipers, outdoor furniture, doors and door frames, aerials, wiring and the list goes on. The damage to community assets may be quite severe and potentially leave councils exposed to claims by ratepayers, tenants and community organisations.

Councils have applied creative methods to try and disperse corellas. For example, by using a natural predator such as a falcon, or using drones to scare the birds away. Some councils have considered culling but this is not always supported by the community.

As the corella problem seems to go beyond one council’s resources, councils may want to consider working together to propose joint solutions. An example is the Little Corellas Project by the University of South Australia with the support of the South Australian government and six local councils. This project explored the management issues of corellas in cities and towns in South Australia and, relevantly, the report recommends streamlining the development of corella management plans among local councils.

See the attached link to the full report

Does your council have any creative methods to deal with the corella problem? Has your council considered educating the community – for example, on your website – on ways to disperse and deal with corellas, in an attempt to limit and prevent destruction to community areas and streets?

Author:
Suzanne Tinkler | Special Counsel
61 3 9258 3652
Suzanne.Tinkler@maddocks.com.au
Author:
Hannah Hofmann | Lawyer
61 3 9258 3613
Hannah.Hofmann@maddocks.com.au

Since February councils in Victoria have been battling with corellas, a type of cockatoo not native to Victoria.  As recent news articles suggest, the corella problem may now have developed into a corella plague, as many councils across Victoria are still affected by large flocks descending upon streets and parks and causing destruction. This problem is not just confined to rural councils with many flocks causing destruction in Melbourne’s inner eastern suburbs. In fact, rural and metropolitan councils across Australia are dealing with corella plagues.

Corellas feed on the seed pods of liquidambar trees and in their search for food they leave public spaces and private gardens in a state of desolation. In order to maintain the length and condition of their beaks, corellas chew through anything they can find: nets in tennis and netball courts, cabins, windscreen wipers, outdoor furniture, doors and door frames, aerials, wiring and the list goes on. The damage to community assets may be quite severe and potentially leave councils exposed to claims by ratepayers, tenants and community organisations.

Councils have applied creative methods to try and disperse corellas. For example, by using a natural predator such as a falcon, or using drones to scare the birds away. Some councils have considered culling but this is not always supported by the community.

As the corella problem seems to go beyond one council’s resources, councils may want to consider working together to propose joint solutions. An example is the Little Corellas Project by the University of South Australia with the support of the South Australian government and six local councils. This project explored the management issues of corellas in cities and towns in South Australia and, relevantly, the report recommends streamlining the development of corella management plans among local councils.

See the attached link to the full report

Does your council have any creative methods to deal with the corella problem? Has your council considered educating the community – for example, on your website – on ways to disperse and deal with corellas, in an attempt to limit and prevent destruction to community areas and streets?

Author:
Suzanne Tinkler | Special Counsel
61 3 9258 3652
Suzanne.Tinkler@maddocks.com.au
Author:
Hannah Hofmann | Lawyer
61 3 9258 3613
Hannah.Hofmann@maddocks.com.au